The Best Film currently on Netflix

Rear Window (1954, Alfred Hitchcock)

You’re a photographer, one who rarely stands still. You shoot action and drama, travel to places unheard of in the 1950s. You’re courting a stunning socialite; “hot” is tame for this dame. But she wants you grounded and she’s got her wish. A crash at a rally track saw to that. Now you’re stuck in your apartment for a couple of months with a broken leg, an acerbic masseuse, and too much time on your hands. You spend your days trying to ignore the New York summer heat, and gazing out of your rear window…

There’s a whole courtyard of mini dramas for this Tom to peep at: differing neighborly tales of love and relationships. Some have just got together. Some are drifting apart. Some are at each other’s throats. It’s diverting more than compelling. If only this place would liven up a bit. Maybe a row? A fistfight? How about a murder?

Sam Bowles

 

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SUMMER MOVIES

Five films to enjoy while the sun’s around:

Dirty Dancing (1987, Emile Ardolino)

1963. A 17-year-old girl, while on holiday with her family in the Catskills, learns how to dance to professional standard in about 2 days. Then gets jiggy with Patrick Swayze.

I know, I know. Why is a man in his 30s drawing attention to a film that’s been precision-engineered to appeal to teenage girls? Because, if you can get past your prejudices, it works like a motherfucker. I think about Dirty Dancing all the time.

Do the Right Thing (1989, Spike Lee)

Racial tensions explode over a single summer’s day in Brooklyn. To the sound of Public Enemy.

Surely the hottest film ever. (And I’m not talking about Rosie Perez in a vest top.)

My Neighbour Totoro (1988, Hayao Miyazaki)

Two children and their father move to a new house in the countryside, while their mum is ill in hospital. They discover some big-time magic is going on in the natural world.

Miyazaki’s masterpiece. Proof that a story doesn’t require an antagonist. The precise observations about the ways in which children interact with their environment are unparalleled. (Nb. Please, if you have the option, watch this film in the original Japanese with subtitles. It’s not pretentious; it’s just better.)

Rear Window (1954, Alfred Hitchcock)

A photographer with a broken leg spies sinister goings-on out of his flat window.

It’s funny. It’s cool. It’ll make you wish one of your neighbours would commit murder. I’m still waiting for one of the bastards near me to come through…

A Scene at the Sea (1991, Takeshi Kitano)

A hearing-impaired man learns to surf. And that’s it.

Kitano’s reliably idiosyncratic staging, camera style and sense of humour are wedded to a stronger emotional hook than usual. The storytelling is so visual, you could turn off the subtitles. It doesn’t get much better than this.

Sam Bowles